Donald Ross (1912-1999)

   
   

There is an interaction between man and nature, which can only take place in the crucible of the mind's eye.

Engaging this process has sustained his interest in photography over the last 40 years. Many of his photographs are made in the surroundings close to his home in central Vermont, locations quite familiar to him. Beyond their scenic character, these are places of the imagination. His affinity is for the landscapes in which the strangeness of things prevails, where the weight of the world may be suspended, where up may become down, where reflections may seem more real than the things themselves.

He has spent years revisiting these locations. Not to make the same "pretty pictures" over again, but more in acknowledgment of the impossibility of getting things exactly right. He prefers to work early in the morning, at dawn or just before. At this hour he feels connected to a world that seems uniquely his as it unfolds. On fingers of fog, in the weight of stone, or in stillness itself, he is grateful for new perspectives and insight wherever and whenever they occur.

Donald was a California photographer, with his home in Berkeley for sixty years.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
Leaves, Berkely 1977 | Silver Gelatin Print | 471.16.10
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
Patzcuaro 1979 | Silver Gelatin Print | 470.16.10
     
     
     
     
 
Julie, Berkley 1977 | 8x10 Silver Gelatin Print | 599.16.11
   
           
           
 
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